Heroism at Liss station prior to WW1

Petersfield Post 28th November 2018 Nostalgia Section recalls an act of heroism by the booking clerk, Percy Norwood,  at Liss Railway Station on November 27th 1913 for which he received the Edward Medal*- a forerunner of the George Medal.

He saved the life of a local blacksmith who was driving a cart approaching the railway crossing. The pony pulling the cart bolted and dashed into the level crossing gates throwing Harry Rasell into the path of an approaching train. Norwood just succeeded in getting Rasell clear, but the engine which had been thrown into reverse by the engine driver, still struck Norwood on the head causing him  serious injuries – fractured skull amongst others.  After recovery he returned to work on the London & South Western Railway. He died in 1972 aged 79.

Percy Norwood came from Eastleigh and in 1977 a primary school was named after him. The school holds an annual event to remember his heroism.

*Edward Medal instituted in the reign of Edward VII for miners, quarry men and industrial workers who had risked their lives for fellow workers. In 1971 holders of this medal were given the option of converting their award to the George Cross. This was introduced in 1940 for acts of great courage not in the face of an enemy and is the highest bravery award that can be given to civilians. One of the most famous recipients of the GC was the people of Malta for their courage in the siege of that island  by the Italian and German forces during WW 2